Pixie Griffiths-Grant was born a whole three months early.

At 20 weeks, she had stopped growing in the womb. Then her mother’s placenta and umbilical cord stopped functioning properly.

At 28 weeks, Sharon Grant had an emergency C-section and Pixie was born weighing only 1 pound, small enough to fit inside the palm of her mother’s hand.

She was quickly dying, and doctors estimated she would live only an hour.

But then quick thinking doctors wrapped her in a plastic sandwich bag to bring her to intensive care—it was small enough that she fit snugly, and it kept her warm.

“It was so random,” Grant told The Telegraph. Pixie was wrapped inside a Tesco brand bag. She said it must have just been what the doctors had on hand.

Afterwards, they wrapped Pixie up in bubble wrap.

Babies have thin skin, meaning water evaporates quickly, so plastic can actually keep babies warmer than a blanket. Though you’ll seldom see one in a plastic sandwich bag, sterile plastic wrapping is now standard treatment for newborn infants.

Pixie was so fragile Grant wasn’t able to hold her for 18 days—every time she was handled, she would lose weight.

“It was amazing that she survived, but it was truly traumatic,” Grant said.

But after 5 months, the baby was healthy enough to go home.

“When we went in the front door Pixie came alive. She was looking all over the place and could see what was happening,” Grant said.  “It’s so lovely to have her home; there’s been endless cuddles and lots of people eager to see her. It’s amazing.”